Summer report cards (Part 1)

Report-Card-1It still feels like the season just ended. I guess it was just a few weeks ago so that’s fine, but free agency started with a super-sized bang and fizzled almost instantaneously so now we all feel like summer is still taking forever when in fact training camp is really just a few weeks away.

Great news, right? Well not unless your team spent the summer either farting around and doing nothing or spending their money like drunken fools.

With only a handful of good free agents still out there and my inability to predict trades, it’s safe to start assigning grades and blame to everyone. I’m anal so I’m doing it alphabetically. Also, I ramble so Anaheim to Montreal will be in this post. Nashville-Winnipeg in the one that comes later on. My grades are in parenthesis.

Anaheim: Dustin Penner is a nice pickup. No, really he is. Do you think a guy who gets top-six minutes is going to have single-digit shot percentages with a run-and-gun-like team in the Ducks the way he did with the grind ‘em up Kings the last three seasons? Heck no. Now just re-sign Teemu and team him up with Jakob Silfverberg and get down to business with the rest of the kids. (B-minus)

Boston: Hoo boy, what a summer. They’ve dumped so many people this summer you’ll have to get a program opening night. Basically they’ve swapped out Nathan Horton, Tyler Seguin, Rich Peverley, Jaromir Jagr and Andrew Ference for Loui Eriksson, Jarome Iginla, and going with their kids on the blue line (Dougie Hamilton, Torey Krug, Matt Bartkowski). That’s more than a facelift. Their AHL kids did well last season and having faith in them to do it at the NHL level next year says a lot. GM Peter Chiarelli has done enough to be trusted but he’s got to hope everyone else picks up the offensive slack. (C)

Buffalo: What should’ve happened is Ville Leino got bought out and they found ways to deal Thomas Vanek and/or Ryan Miller. Instead, Leino is recovering from surgery so he couldn’t be bought out and Nathan Gerbe was sent paid-packing and (as of now) neither superstar on the final year of their deal has a new address. Perfect! Swapping Andrej Sekera for Jamie McBain was a nice change-of-address deal but all the same issues and headaches from last season are still here. Buffalo? More like Barf-alo, am I right?!?!?! (F)

Calgary: Yuck. Why hasn’t this team signed Mikhail Grabovski yet? Karri Ramo is going to be their No. 1 goalie too? What a mess this team and organization is. (F-minus)

Carolina: Swinging a deal with Buffalo is worth… Something. Signing Mike Komisarek is interesting as a reclamation project. Parting ways with Chad LaRose seems odd as Carolina never really seems to let anyone go. Signing Anton Khudobin to backup Cam Ward is more than reasonable. They’re reportedly also sniffing around at Jaromir Jagr. Cool, I guess. They didn’t seem to improve so… (C-minus)

Chicago: Just like 2010 they won the Stanley Cup and then cleared the decks of heavy money. Out goes Dave Bolland, Michael Frolik, Dan Carcillo and Ray Emery and in comes… Well… The kids? Nikolai Khabibulin returns to take Emery’s backup job but the other positions could be filled by AHL youngsters like blog-favorite Brandon Pirri (can’t spell “Pirri” without “RPI after all), re-committing to Marcus Kruger, and handing the annoyance keys off to Brandon Bollig. Keeping Bryan Bickell as comparatively reasonable money turned out looking smart in the end. Like Chiarelli, Stan Bowman has earned a pass on his decisions. (B)

Colorado: Drafting Nathan MacKinnon first overall will be debated for years to come. Bringing back all sorts of old Avs players for different roles (even Alex Tanguay to play) is nice for the whole nostalgia thing they’ve got going on. They’re going with their kids on defense but didn’t add to it and also locked up Matt Duchene. After playing hardball with him, giving him $6 million a season is a nice thank-you card. With Patrick Roy at the helm they were already going to be worth keeping an eye on. They could sneak in as a playoff team if Roy focuses them. If not… Get the popcorn ready because the fireworks will be awesome. Yes, Greg Sherman will bring the popcorn to your seat. (C)

Columbus: They set out to make one big splash and did inking Nathan Horton. Everything else they’ve done this summer is internal housekeeping. Horton’s deal doesn’t come without questions. Seven years and big money for a guy with injury problems and who won’t suit up until perhaps December thanks to shoulder surgery means Jarmo Kekalainen will hear about it if he doesn’t bounce back well. Life will be A LOT harder in their new division with the old Patrick Division pals. Are they good enough to slog it out with them all year? Hmm.. (B for “wow” factor, C for overall)

Dallas: Give it up to Jim Nill for doing some work as the new GM. Sending Eriksson out for Seguin and Peverley was ballsy and adding Shawn Horcoff helped make them stronger instantly up the middle. Their forwards needed more depth badly and that’s what he’s done. The D is young and Kari Lehtonen’s always tenuous injury situation made them go get Dan Ellis as a backup. Their grade hinges on whether or not Seguin can put the beer bong down long enough to score 30-40 goals. Hmm… (B-minus)

Detroit: Leave it to the Wings to go ahead and just lure away one team’s long-time captain and another’s should’ve-been captain. Daniel Alfredsson and Stephen Weiss help make it a great summer for Ken Holland. Letting Valtteri Filppula walk was a smart move as was buying out Carlo Colaiacovo. Like it or not, they’re going with kids on defense. They’ve still got a move (or two or three) left to make to thin out their forwards and re-sign key RFAs but Detroit appears more than ready to attack the East. (A-minus)

Edmonton: The Oilers frustrate me. I see all the talent on the roster and I instantly believe they should be a playoff team. I want to believe the few moves they made this summer will make that happen. Their defense needed help badly and Boyd Gordon will help with that amongst the forwards while Andrew Ference and Denis Grebeshkov can help the blue line figure themselves out. Devan Dubnyk is more than OK in goal. Dealing Magnus Paajarvi for David Perron is curious but for whatever reason the Oilers seemed to lose faith in him. C’est la vie. They’re not flashy moves but, God help me, I like them. (B)

Florida: So, uh, hey… Panthers. What’s happening? Oh right, nothing. Just building through the draft I see. They didn’t get anything going for Roberto Luongo and now they’re going to basically run with an insanely young team next season. Aleksander Barkov will be a star the same way Jonathan Huberdeau will. Erik Gudbranson came along late last year and I’m not selling out Jacob Markstrom as he’s still a freakin’ kid. That said, they didn’t do anything free agent or trade-wise of significance this summer. (D)

Los Angeles: Losing Rob Scuderi stinks for LA, but that’s why they have Robyn Regehr now. And added Jeff Schultz. And re-signed Keaton Ellerby, Alec Martinez, Jake Muzzin and anyone else who plays defense there. Losing Brad Richardson and Dustin Penner may hurt early on, but it seemed clear that Tyler Toffoli was going to get more ice time one way or another. This clears the decks a bit. Dan Carcillo will help give the Kings someone to make really bad decisions and someone for Darryl Sutter to point at. Hey, at least Jeff Carter and Mike Richards have a running buddy again. (C)

Minnesota: Another team with youth waiting in the wings that will get a chance to show what they have… Or else. Out went Pierre-Marc Bouchard, Matt Cullen, Cal Clutterbuck and Devin Setoguchi. Dany Heatley would’ve been bought out but had that late season injury and surgery preventing that. In comes Matt Cooke to draw the ire of opponents (and locals!) while killing penalties on the ice (NOT PEOPLE). If Wild fans didn’t get enough of a look at Charlie Coyle, Jeff Zucker, and Mikael Granlund last year, they’re going to get A LOT of them next season. Being tight against the cap sure is fun! (C)

Montreal: Adding George Parros to help make Brandon Prust’s life easier? Sounds stupid but it might actually work. Prust was far more important to his rookie linemates Alex Galchenyuk and Brandon Gallagher as a physical force rather than a face-puncher. Daniel Briere is *thisclose* to being done as an offensive weapon in the league but he’ll do good PR in Quebec. None of these moves matter a lick if Carey Price can’t return to form and the Habs defense doesn’t reappear magically.  (C)

My NHL Awards ballot

In the past I’m sure I’ve vented about how results went in the NHL Awards. Now I get to stop wagging my finger at others and get it wagged in my face instead.

Yes, yours truly is a member of the Professional Hockey Writers Association now and that means I get to vote.

Which ones? Only some of the most interesting ones. This year I had to fill out ballots for the Hart Trophy, Norris Trophy, Calder Trophy, Selke Trophy, Masterton Trophy, and Lady Byng Trophy. I also picked out what my NHL All-Star and All-Rookie teams would be.

In an effort to give full disclosure on my ballot and my thoughts, here goes nothing.

Hart Trophy
1. Alexander Ovechkin – Washington Capitals
2. Sidney Crosby – Pittsburgh Penguins
3. John Tavares – New York Islanders
4. Sergei Bobrovsky – Columbus Blue Jackets
5. Jonathan Toews – Chicago Blackhawks

For everyone who thought the Ovi vs. Sidney war was over, it secretly got re-fired up this year. Only downside was that there weren’t many head-to-head match-ups and each star had bouts where they either didn’t play well or didn’t play at all. I give the nod to Ovechkin because as he went, the team went with him. Coach (and blog favorite) Adam Oates figured out how to make it work for him and the team is thriving because of it.

That’s not to say Crosby was less than that. Far from it. He was easily the most dominant player in the league, but for me it’s about the importance to the team and Pittsburgh rolled on without him.

John Tavares’ candidacy is one I made enough of a stink about on Twitter and I believe the Islanders would’ve again been a lottery team floundering on Long Island without him. I certainly hope Brad Boyes bought him many a dinner for helping him have another bounce-back season.

Bobrovsky’s case is simple to make: He put the Blue Jackets in contention for the playoffs for the first time in five years solely based on his play in goal. The team was one of the lowest scoring in the league and that meant he had to be nails every night. Unfortunately the Jackets didn’t figure out Bob was their guy soon enough to lift them into the postseason.

Toews gets my fifth and final vote based on his leadership and fantastic all-around play. Doing that on the league’s best team says a lot. No, this wasn’t a throwaway vote.

Norris Trophy
1. Ryan Suter – Minnesota Wild
2. P.K. Subban – Montreal Canadiens
3. Zdeno Chara – Boston Bruins
4. Drew Doughty – Los Angeles Kings
5. Dion Phaneuf – Toronto Maple Leafs

Suter’s play this season was impossible to not watch. Seeing how he would do after leaving Shea Weber’s side in Nashville was worth checking out anyhow. Seeing him thrive and become the go-to guy for the Wild and help groom rookie Jonas Brodin proved he was worth the money. Sure he struggled to start the season but you could see he was trying too hard to carry the team. Once he settled in he became the guy who earned my top vote for best defenseman.

Subban, meanwhile, showed the Habs why he was so important to them and why messing around with his contract was so foolish in the first place. He’s easily their best player and plays equally as strong both offensively and defensively.

Do I really need to explain Chara’s spot on my ballot? If I do, you haven’t been watching him play. Get it together.

Doughty, like Suter, did his part to carry the load for a team that needed the stability. Injuries nearly derailed the start of the year for the Kings but Doughty’s play settled things down. Also like Suter, he helped bring a rookie along into the fold (Jake Muzzin in this case) and helped him become a fixture in the lineup.

Sure Leafs players get lots of press and attention. I get that, but Phaneuf’s play this season was quietly awesome. His physical play and offensive skills have shone through all while being paired up with a host of different partners.

Calder Trophy
1. Nail Yakupov – Edmonton Oilers
2. Jonas Brodin – Minnesota Wild
3. Jonathan Huberdeau – Florida Panthers
4. Brendan Gallagher – Montreal Canadiens
5. Cory Conacher – Tampa Bay Lightning/Ottawa Senators

Rookie of the year makes for a vote that I’m fascinated to see how it turns out. Yakupov ruffled feathers with his exuberant play and celebrations but he just kept getting better as the season went along. Finishing with a hat trick in the final game and 17 goals in a short season earns the nod from me.

Brodin was nothing short of awesome in becoming Minnesota’s other top defenseman. Playing next to Suter helps out a lot, no doubt, but the kid is real good. Maybe we’ll see some of that against Chicago.

Huberdeau, like Yakupov, was also really good all season long and his play helped make this vote really difficult for me. I love his game and I love the future he’s set to have in the league.

Gallagher’s play with the Habs was consistently solid all year. He’s also good as a major pain in the ass type of player. Hard to not like that kind of player (unless you’re a fan of a team he’s playing). He and fellow rookie Alex Galchenyuk were equally good this season, but Galchenyuk’s play was only just starting to ramp up. Look out, Ottawa.

Speaking of Ottawa, Conacher got off to a flying start with Tampa Bay before being dealt for Ben Bishop (a pair of guys I’ve interviewed during their AHL stints during the lockout). He cooled off a bit at the end but it was a toss-up between him and Justin Schultz for my final vote. I went for Conacher.

Don’t worry, I won’t bore you with more words for the last few awards.

Selke Trophy
1. Jay McClement – Toronto Maple Leafs
2. Frans Nielsen – New York Islanders
3. Patrice Bergeron – Boston Bruins
4. Anze Kopitar – Los Angeles Kings
5. Ryan Callahan – New York Rangers

McClement was the very definition of a defensive forward. Nielsen has been sorely underrated as one in the past and showed how good he is again this season. I’ll likely take heat from you guys for having Bergeron third and that might be fair. Kopitar’s defensive skills fly so far under the radar I don’t know how many folks remember he’s one of the best there.

Lady Byng Trophy
1. Matt Carle – Tampa Bay Lightning
2. Logan Couture – San Jose Sharks
3. Henrik Lundqvist – New York Rangers
4. Martin St. Louis – Tampa Bay Lightning
5. Matt Moulson – New York Islanders

Go ahead, cry “East Coast bias!” if you want. Go ahead and figure out what criteria you think applies to this award.

Masterton Trophy
1. Josh Harding – Minnesota Wild
2. Adam McQuaid – Boston Bruins
3. James Sheppard – San Jose Sharks

Listen, no one is beating Harding’s case for perseverance this year. Playing after being diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis is almost as slam-dunk as it gets. McQuaid’s story of overcoming a serious blood clotting problem that threatened his career might’ve done it for him any other season.

My All-Star and All-Rookie teams I’ll just list for you with no comment. Just know that the All-Star team required choices made at each position while the All-Rookie team asked for three forwards regardless of position.

NHL All-Star Team
Center: Sidney Crosby, Steven Stamkos, Jonathan Toews

Right Wing: Alex Ovechkin, Martin St. Louis, Patrick Kane

Left Wing: Taylor Hall, Henrik Zetterberg, Rick Nash

Defense: Ryan Suter, Zdeno Chara, Drew Doughty, Dion Phaneuf, P.K. Subban. Francois Beauchemin

Goaltender: Henrik Lundqvist, Sergei Bobrovsky, James Reimer

NHL All-Rookie Team
Forward: Nail Yakupov, Jonathan Huberdeau, Brendan Gallagher

Defense: Jonas Brodin, Justin Schultz

Goal: Robin Lehner

AHL life isn’t so bad really

OK so this isn’t going to be me opining about whether I am Team Owners or Team Players in this whole, stupid affair. I sympathize with the players and I think they’re getting boned over by guys that can’t figure out how to do math and want a do-over.

No, this is more about what I’ve seen from the NHL guys who were exiled to the AHL because of the petty fighting.

The guys that are there are kids. At the oldest, they’re 22 or 23 but in the case of guys like Sean Couturier, he’s 19 and spending his time in a league that he’s probably too good for. What I saw from him the other night in Glens Falls in a loss to Rochester was a guy trying too hard to do everything.

He’s got a pair of linemates who are likely better off in the AHL and won’t see much, if any, time in the NHL. Still, through all that, Couturier managed to get two assists. He was on fire for the whole game and showed the tenaciousness we saw from him against Pittsburgh. He was the guy that made Evgeni Malkin lose his cool again, only in the AHL against a handful of other NHL guys.

The crazy part is, the AHL is still a very good league. With all things being normal it might be the second best league in the world, yet guys like Couturier, Adam Henrique, Chris Kreider, and Adam Larsson have to be there because that’s how it works when you’re on your entry-level deal.

And the time they spend there? It’s going to make them monsters. Just think of the guys in Oklahoma City. Jordan Eberle, Ryan Nugent-Hopkins, Justin Schultz, and maybe eventually Taylor Hall as well.

Amazing.

So much talent there that should be getting showcased in the NHL… But it’s not. Instead of playing in New York City, Boston, or Los Angeles these young stars are getting their kicks in Rochester, Worcester, and Abbotsford.

That’s not how it should be, but whenever the players and owners decide to be grownups about this whole CBA thing, those kids are going to come back to the NHL a lot stronger and a lot better off because of it. If you thought you saw great things out of these kids last year, you haven’t seen anything yet.

Even better still, if you’re near an AHL city you can see them play on the cheap and show what they’re all about. We could sit and dwell about how it sucks something awful that we’re not seeing them in the NHL, but you could just look on the bright side of life and see them play in their own brand of barnstorming tour.

Thoughts from RPI’s exhibition

There was plenty to like and plenty to pick apart from RPI’s 6-2 win over Acadia. It can always be misleading to judge what you see out of a team in an exhibition game against inferior talent, but I’ll give it a whirl anyway.

— The sophomores looked a bit more grown up (duh). Notably Matt Neal and Jacob Laliberte had fun games. Creative with the puck, no seemingly dumb plays, and helped push the offense. RPI needs that badly.

— I knew going into the season goaltending was going to be fascinating to watch and the exhibition left me thinking freshman Jason Kasdorf (pictured) and sophomore Scott Diebold are going to make senior Bryce Merriam a resident of the bench more often than not this year.

— Yes, I know that’s potentially a dumb thought to have after each guy got 20 minutes of action but my feeling is that Merriam’s leash is going to be really short this year.

— I dig Milos Bubela. If I was still doing photoshops, there’d be one of Mike Myers as Linda Richman yelling about her favorite bubbelah being Bubela. I like puns.

— I think Mark McGowan is going to have a nice year. He’s shaping up to be a solid all-around player and the goal he scored sure looked pretty. Granted the Acadia goalie was playing too deep in his net and he reacted late, but still.

— The defense is going to be fascinating to watch. Pat Koudys is gone, Nick Bailen is still awesome, and Curtis Leonard is just solid all around. Freshman Phil Hampton makes me curious. He showed a good shot from the point and seemed to just be involved in the play a bunch.

— Bo Dolan still looked like a freshman. He’s a third pair guy but I’d like to buy him some confidence.

— Of the freshmen (and there’s a bunch) I think Mike Zalewski and Mark Miller are going to be insta-helpers. Zalewski’s size and skill should help him evolve into a solid scorer while Miller seems to have the makings of a good checking line type player.

Obviously this is a really small sample size to judge from, but there’s reason to keep your head up if you’re an RPI fan. The team is crazy young though so there’s going to be mistakes and missteps along the way.

Teams are going to play tighter defensively and be a bit faster than Acadia was so they won’t get to skate circles around everyone. Add in the ECAC being a mostly trap-and-bore league and it makes for a hell of a grind. If they don’t get worn down and overly frustrated by the league schedule this could wind up being a very fun team to watch.

Descend into the madness of my ECAC preseason picks

It”s’ a time honored tradition in college sports: the preseason poll. While both USCHO and USA Today (with the coaches) will have their own college hockey Top 20, the poll I actually vote in is the only one I care to talk about — The ECAC preseason media poll and all-conference team.

You see, I can explain to you my thoughts (or total lack thereof) when it comes to how I see things shaking out in the conference and since this is my site, that’s how things roll around here. While I’m good at keeping up on things in college hockey, my life is consumed with professional hockey which means I get a sort of slanted view of what goes on.

That means I’m reading way more of Ken Schott at The Gazette for Union stuff and Ed Weaver at the Troy Record on RPI. I also have many friends and other folks who are either Cornell alums or REALLY big fans, so I hear enough about the Big Red to make me want to vomit out of my ears. Other schools… fall by the way side.

Enough rambling, here’s how I ranked everyone out on my ballot:

  1. Cornell
  2. Union
  3. Harvard
  4. Quinnipiac
  5. Dartmouth
  6. Yale
  7. St. Lawrence
  8. Rensselaer
  9. Clarkson
  10. Princeton
  11. Colgate
  12. Brown

It’s not really a surprise considering the top two teams as they were the top two last year. Union loses a handful of really good players while Cornell just keeps plugging right along. Hang on though, when you get a look at my all-conference ballot you’ll probably wonder what the hell my glitch is.

  • G: Troy Grosenick – Union
  • D: Shayne Gostisbehere – Union
  • D: Danny Biega – Harvard
  • F: Daniel Carr – Union
  • F: Kellen Jones – Quinnipiac
  • F: Kenny Agostino – Yale

Yes, three Union players and none from Cornell yet I have Cornell taking the conference. Why? I think Cornell is a deeper, more dedicated-to-their-system team. Every year no matter how much turnover there is in their roster, Cornell sits in the top four of the ECAC. It might not be the greatest hockey to watch in what is the second-weakest conference in the NCAAs, but that brand of consistency is rare.

These top two teams are also the only ones I’ve got any confidence at all in saying they’ll finish there. They were the conference’s only tournament teams last year and barring upsets in the tournament, it could be that way again.

As for 3-12… Honestly, I might as well draw names from a hat but I figured I’d give it a shot to place them where I think they’ll go. Reasons? Here goes nothing.

Harvard: Why not third? They tied so many games last year it kept them afloat. They lose some forward talent with Alex Killorn graduated but that’s it.

Quinnipiac: Lots of good forward talent here and I think that’ll be good enough to keep them in business all year. I’m a big fan of Kellen and Connor Jones with Matthew Peca assisting them both. Eric Hartzell is a quietly very solid goalie.

Dartmouth: Every year I expect better things from the Big Green and they keep letting me down. Yet here I am again. I’m a sucker. Lots of questions abound here, especially in goal (Cab Morris?). Brandon McNally was huge in conference last year, could be primed for a breakout second season.

Yale: It’s tough to pick against Keith Allain’s team as there’s still a lot of talent there, but things are lacking a bit now. Brian O’Neill was a huge player for them. Thankfully they’ve got an older Kenny Agostino to pick things up. Antoine Laganiere is a pure sniper. Goaltending was OK, but has to be better.

St. Lawrence: Loads of young scorers here but questions persist elsewhere. How they do without master tactician head coach Joe Marsh (retirement) will dictate where they finish.

Rensselaer: Seth Appert’s young team has loads and loads of potential and could be a team that winds up higher than where I’ve got them. It all depends on how well second-year guys Ryan Haggerty, Jacob Laliberte, Zach Schroeder, and Mark McGowan grow up and how well the host of new guys fit in. (Homer hopes: Last year’s kids turn into stud scorers and this year’s frosh blend in seamlessly – fingers crossed)

Clarkson: It’s nice to greatly dislike this team again with Casey Jones as the head coach now that George Roll is kickstarting the D-III program at Nazareth. They’re back to playing boring hockey and they’re very hate-able again. RPI beating them in the playoffs last year won’t sit well but they need better talent.

Princeton: So this is what happens when a good coach goes elsewhere. Things fall off for a bit. Or maybe they won’t and they’ll surprise. Who knows?!

Colgate: I’ll make this one easy – Austin Smith is gone. Coach Don Vaughn will figure out another way to pester the conference though.

Brown: It’s the annual tradition of picking Brown to finish last. Some things just never change.

Look who’s back

“Hey players, spin the wheel, make the deal… OR ELSE!

It’s only been eight years since the last NHL work stoppage and hey, look at that, we’re about to have another one.

The last lockout got me my fire back to write. I started blogging, mostly to vent about everything that was good and stupid about what the NHL and NHLPA did in 2004 to help kill a season and then come back to win the fans over with false promises and “rule changes” that were just the same rules they had already and made sure to call them. Well, for a year or two anyhow.

Now we’re back at what seems like square one all over again, only this time it’s on the owners for being belligerent. After all, how else do you explain locking out the players for using the system they killed a year to get implemented? You can’t explain it, it doesn’t make sense.

Problem now is it’s all a PR game. The players want to make sure they don’t look bad in front of the fans and the owners just want their damn money back that they willingly forked over to the players. Does it sound like I’ve taken a side here? I guess it does.

In the meantime, I’ll be making sure to spend more time in Albany and Glens Falls to see displaced NHL players with AHL options. That means really good things for all the teams in the AHL as there’s a ton of talented players headed that way. Will it pay off in better attendance in some places? It’d be nice.

You won’t be lacking in hockey options, kids, there’s plenty to be had. AHL, ECHL, NCAA, CHL… They’re all there waiting for your (renewed?) support. The NHL will survive one way or another, it just depends on how big of a black eye it ends up wearing when it’s all said and done.

Random thoughts at a random time

With a few days off from writing for the Peacock, I’ve got a few things bouncing around my brain.

— Folks are starting to fret about labor issues disrupting the start of the season. It’s a healthy thing to worry about but the juxtaposition between “fan worries” and “colleague worries” is so different.

Fans are worried they won’t have hockey to watch and get worked up about. Colleagues are worried, in some cases, that they won’t have something to help them collect a paycheck. These are the sorts of things the league and players don’t keep in mind.

Yes, players won’t get paid if there’s a lockout, but when they do get back to work they’re making a pretty penny (even if their salaries do get rolled back). For writers, freelancers especially, that’s not how it works and it sucks. Big time. I know both sides won’t think about these things, but for the sake of sanity let’s hope they keep the kvetching to a minimum.

A while back I got into a bit of a Twitter row with my pal Bruce Arthur of The National Post when I stupidly didn’t think of the big picture in these matters (this was in a discussion of the NBA lockout at the time). I get it and, as usual, Bruce was right.

— I feel for Scott Howson. He’s a good guy, a nice guy, but that doesn’t always make you good at your job. That said, he did what he had to do in dealing Rick Nash and while I think he had a better offer on the table from the Rangers at the deadline (one which he said “no” to), he did well in getting what he did from New York now.

He gambled on teams being eager to pay up big to get a superstar once free agency, he gambled (mostly) wrong. Dubinsky is a nice player, as is Anisimov, but Tim Erixon (he of the curious karma) is the guy who can help maybe make this deal a push when we look back on it in years.

Then again, Nash could re-discover he’s a superstar on Broadway and become a Manhattan folk hero and Columbus fans will never hear the end of it no matter what. Hooray fun!

All that aside, read up on Aaron Portzline’s 61 thoughts on the Nash deal is a must-read. Suffice to say, there’s a lot more than meets the eye.

Science interlude: HOLY CRAP, THERE’S WATER IN SPACE

— Alexander Semin is a freaking lightning rod of controversy. “No way! Really?!” you say sarcastically. “Shut up, it’s my website,” I say back to you.

People love him (mostly Caps fans), people hate him (hockey old timers and other Caps fans) but they guy is stupid talented. I hope he takes this opportunity in Carolina and uses it to prove to everyone what he’s capable of. If he pulls a Zherdev and decides to be moody, that will be massively disappointing.

– Favorite idea of the weekend? Derek Zona’s thought to deal Jordan Eberle for P.K. Subban. The thinking here is Eberle’s value (and image) has never been higher while Subban is massively under-appreciated in Montreal. Couldn’t agree more with that line of thought.

Of course, that also means Steve Tambellini would never have the cojones to try and do it. Life is forever a pipe dream in Edmonton.

— Zona is also sky-high on Oliver Ekman-Larsson. File that under: Duh.

— I’m loving the beach volleyball at the Olympics. It’s the least fuddy-duddy sport of the Games, and me saying “fuddy-duddy” practically makes me one as it is. It’s like I NARC’d on myself.

— Love it that Teemu Selanne is back for another year. Now if we can just get Daniel Alfredsson to do the same, that’d be great. It’s still a huge bummer Nicklas Lidstrom decided to hang it up, but after talking with Aaron Ward during the Stanley Cup finals (he’s the guy that broke the news after all) it sounds like Lidstrom had his mind made up for a while.

— I’ll try to do these more often. I got inspired reading Peter King’s Monday Morning Quarterback and while I know he gets plenty of grief, I enjoy how personable he makes his columns. He takes you into team camps, he gets you inside to let you know what’s going on and hey, you’ll get some coffee and beer talk too. Put me down for a few of the latter.

(all photos courtesy of AP – they’ll probably yell at me now)

Finally

For the few years I was scribbling nonsense on the Internet before I landed over at NBCSports.com’s ProHockeyTalk, every June would turn into a soap box for me to sound off on why Adam Oates belonged in the Hockey Hall of Fame. His case was always easy to make. No, really, it was super easy to make.

Now? Now he’s a Hockey Hall of Famer.

The fight is over and a childhood hero is enshrined for eternity. Bias accepted here, there’s never been a doubt as to Oates’ career being Hall-worthy.

I am as happy as a hockey fan can be. The complaining, the indignant stat-prattling, the case-making, the whining about it all… It’s over. I don’t have to crow about an open-and-shut case anymore.

There’s no need to talk about the injustice of it all and continue alternating between banging my head against the wall and shouting from the mountain tops. Adam Oates: Hall of Famer.

Back in late September during the preseason, I wanted to interview Oates about being snubbed by the Hall. With him being the Devils assistant coach and it also being the team’s first preseason game of the year, the Hall was the last thing on his mind. All business, all the time. That’s part of what got the Washington Capitals to hire Oates as their head coach today on top of it all.

It feels a bit silly to feel as happy for what someone else accomplished, but that’s part of being a fan, right? Embracing those that helped bring the love of the game to you. Oates is the key figure on my personal “Mount Rushmore” of hockey. Oates, Wayne Gretzky, Steve Yzerman, and Teemu Selanne. There are plenty other players I have a great appreciation for, but those four? They turned hockey from something I watched and enjoyed into something I obsess over and love dearly, maybe a bit too much if you ask some of my friends.

But Oates? He was the guy who sparked it all for me. Seeing a guy like that play live in person when you’re a kid leaves an impression on you. Seeing him win your favorite local team a championship hammers it home even more. Watching him excel as a professional for nearly 20 years is icing on the cake.

Adam Oates is a Hockey Hall of Famer. What a great day.

 

So long UAH hockey; Now let’s point some fingers

After two years of trying to fight the good fight, Alabama-Huntsville hockey will be no more after this season.

Oh sure, interim school president and Alabama education hitman Malcolm Stopera will say that moving UAH hockey from Division I down to club level isn’t a big deal because there’ll still be hockey at UAH in some form, but this a needless killing and one that leaves a lot of blood on a lot of different hands in the college hockey world. The Alabama education system can justify their decision citing costs all they want to, but college hockey on the whole should feel sick about this as should the UAH leadership.

This wasn’t just one new conference coming to rise and writing UAH’s death warrant, this was a total failure on the part of college hockey world to help out a weakened brother. This is the fault of a hired gun brought into the UAH leadership to make the big decision and get the hell out of town as fast as possible.

This was a hired hit and one that the leaders of the CCHA, WCHA, NCHC, and Big 10 all helped bring about.

The CCHA’s failure to throw UAH a bone years ago when they added now-soon-to-depart Nebraska-Omaha to the conference was the first, and most deadly, shot across the bow for the Chargers. Tom Anastos and his group of ignorant conference leaders, who got their own come-uppances when the Big 10 Conference was formed, helped provide the example of how to ruin a school’s program. By leaving UAH to be independents, a team without a conference to call home, they left them to perish.

Here’s to hoping that Anastos, now the Michigan State head coach, can live with his decision. Of course, he comes out smelling like a dead rose through all of this mess after ditching the CCHA to coach Sparty who is conveniently ditching the CCHA themselves for the Big 10. Convenient, eh?

The conference realignment jumble, confusing in its own right in seeing the WCHA and CCHA try to save face after the Big 10 was formed and then seeing their own plans shot to pieces when the NCHC was created putting a final bullet in the CCHA and turning the WCHA into a conference filled with also-rans. Neither the NCHC nor the soon-to-be brand new WCHA even cast a glance toward UAH for membership.

Rather than help out UAH, the NCHC waited to see if Notre Dame would join their elitist hockey party only to be spurned in favor of Hockey East. An Irish middle finger is a middle finger nonetheless. The WCHA took on fellow death bed program Bowling Green in their scramble to put something that resembled a conference together. Did they call UAH though? No friggin’ way.

Instead, they ignored UAH. They let them sit around as an independent left to wither away and die without the help of a conference to call home and a conference schedule to give them a host of home dates. Take a look at UAH’s schedule for this, their now final season. The last games they play in Huntsville are in late February against the US National Development Team. Games like that are an exhibition meant to show the school off to guys they could potentially recruit.

Oops.

Instead, they’re going out at home with a whimper after a schedule that sees them play on the road in games they had to beg and plead for to play anyhow. This is what the college hockey landscape turned into – one that saw schools turn on each other to save their own skin and left the weakest of the litter out to starve.

Now these Chargers are being put down while a bunch of different hands are pushing off pulling the trigger on everyone else.

It’s sad. It’s sad and disgusting to see things play out this way for the south’s lone outpost for college hockey; A program that rose up from the lower levels of college hockey to become the little school in Dixie that could. They’ve made the NCAA Tournament, they’ve put the scare into top seeds (just ask Notre Dame about what they think of UAH).

Community and student support (both in showing up and financially) didn’t matter to the state of Alabama. All this was for them was a bottom line move, a correction of the books. College hockey, meanwhile, looks the other way while another one of their own dies. A family of 58 is now a family of 57 and there won’t be a single team that will care. The fans of college hockey all care and they’ll make it known at the Frozen Four in Tampa, Florida in April. It’s a bitter pill to swallow that it’s UAH playing the role of the host school, holding the celebration for the crowning of a new champion.

A disgusting end to UAH’s Division-I status concludes with a party on their grave.  While I doubt that Portera gives half a crap about his choice to demote the program, I wonder if the heads of these conferences that all had a hand in this slow killing can accept losing a team in an outpost where hockey is growing in a sport that needs a higher profile, not one that sees it let its hurting brothers die.

A long overdue update and a “thank you”

I figured it was high time that I gave you my most loyal of followers here the update as to what’s going to happen with this site. As you may or may not know by now, I’ve moved up in the hockey writing world accepting a position as the lead writer/editor at Pro Hockey Talk on NBCSports.com. This means that I’m spending my days and evenings making sure we’ve got all the news and opinions on what’s going on in the NHL updated on our site to make sure we all stay informed.

It’s a very exciting time for me, personally, as this opportunity has come up rather suddenly, but it’s one I’ve accepted with great eagerness for what it can mean as far as a career goes. As you all may or may not know, this humble little site here based on poking fun at just about everything hockey related as well as appreciating all things that have come from college hockey has been a labor of joy. I got my start with this on my own on a Blogger.com set up, deviated into the “semi-professional” ranks for a short while with my home on Fox Sports 980’s website for a short while and after being laid off by Clear Channel, I went full time into the world in the basement where all sports bloggers come from.

Coincidentally enough, after starting this fancy-pants looking page here with my own domain a year ago (nearly to the date) is when I was offered and accepted the spot with NBC Sports. To say that things have been a whirlwind of different emotions over the last year would be to downplay things tremendously. It’s been straight up bat-shit crazy.

I want you all to know that this site here is not going to go away nor will it fade off into oblivion. I like the stuff that I’ve done here too much to let it all go to waste and disappear into the ether. Updates here are going to be extremely sparse. If you’ve had this page bookmarked and checked back on occasion you’ve noticed that things were already sparse here as it was. Expect that to continue.

What will happen here is going to involve me putting away my nasty snark and saving those bullets for NBC. Hey, come on, that’s what they’re paying me for. Thankfully the Internet is still free so if you want to keep up with that, you can still find me rather easily. Instead, I’ll use this page to post my thoughts, photos and random musings about following college hockey. Next season, I will be a full-fledged RPI Engineers season ticket holder. I may or may not get to pop on WRPI radio now and again to call some games, but for the most part, I’ll be a loudmouthed, heckling idiot sitting on the north side of Houston Field House with some of my best friends both in the real sense and in the “fan” sense.

If you’ve become a fan of the Photoshops, those will be extremely rare and may only occur when I’m inspired. As it is, I think I killed all of your will with the Twilight-themed one anyhow. If you stayed with me through that, God bless your sadistic hearts, I owe you a beer.

I also owe all of you my most heartfelt thanks for encouraging me to keep at this, for enjoying whatever it is I was doing here at any time and just continuing to have fun with what is ultimately a game for grown up kids. Being a guy that just writes about said game doesn’t really make me much of anything in the big picture of things, but I am blessed and flattered and humbled to have the opportunity.

For now though, this isn’t a good-bye by any stretch of the imagination, but this site is on hiatus in the meantime. You’ll hear back from me again come September or if there’s RPI news to be had before then. But expect September. If you’ve enjoyed what I do here, come join me over at Pro Hockey Talk and stay awhile, I plan on sticking around there for a good, long time…. At least until they don’t want to have me anymore.